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Buying Time 2020 – Texas

This page features Texas Supreme Court and Court of Criminal Appeals television advertisements from the 2020 election cycle.

Last Updated: November 11, 2020
Published: October 2, 2020

There are two courts of last resort in Texas: the Texas Supreme Court, which is the court of last resort on civil matters, and the Texas Court of Crim­inal Appeals, which decides crim­inal cases. On both courts, judges serve six-year terms. Texas held a primary elec­tion on March 3, 2020 and held a general elec­tion on Novem­ber 3.

Four seats were up for elec­tion on the Texas Supreme Court. For Place 1, incum­bent Chief Justice Nathan Hecht ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican primary. He was being chal­lenged by District Court Judge Amy Clark Meachum who defeated Court of Appeals Judge Jerry Zimmerer in the Demo­cratic primary, and attor­ney Mark Ash, who ran unop­posed in the Liber­tarian primary. For place 6, incum­bent Justice Jane Bland ran against attor­ney Kathy Cheng for her seat. Bland ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican primary, and Cheng defeated attor­ney Larry Prae­ger in the Demo­cratic primary. For place 7, incum­bent justice Jeffery S. Boyd competed against District Court Judge Staci Willi­ams and attor­ney William Bryan Strange in the general elec­tion. Both Boyd and Strange ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican and Liber­tarian primar­ies respect­ively, while Willi­ams defeated attor­ney Brandy Voss in the Demo­cratic primary. For place 8, incum­bent Justice Brett Busby competed against Court of Appeals Judge Gisela Triana and Tom Oxford. Both Busby and Oxford ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican and Liber­tarian primar­ies respect­ively, whereas Triana defeated Court of Appeals Judge Peter Kelly in the Demo­cratic primary. In the general elec­tion, incum­bent Justices Hecht, Bland, Boyd, and Busby all held on to their seats with 53%, 55%, 54%, and 54% of the vote respect­ively.

There were three seats up for elec­tion on the Texas Court of Crim­inal Appeals. For place 3, incum­bent Justice Bert Richard­son competed against former District Court Judge Eliza­beth Davis Frizell. In the Repub­lican primary, Richard­son defeated attor­ney Gina Parker. In the Demo­cratic primary, Frizell defeated former Terrell city coun­cil­man Dan Wood and attor­ney William Demond. For place 4, incum­bent Justice Kevin Patrick Yeary competed against District Court Judge Tina Yoo Clin­ton. While Yeary ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican primary, Yoo Clin­ton defeated attor­ney Steven Miears in the Demo­cratic primary. For place 9, incum­bent Justice David Newell competed against District Court Judge Brandon Birm­ing­ham. Both ran unop­posed in the Repub­lican and Demo­cratic primar­ies, respect­ively. In the general elec­tion, incum­bent Justices Richard­son, Yeary, and Newell all held on to their seats with 55%, 55%, and 56% of the vote, respect­ively.

Kantar Media/CMAG: Estim­ated Total TV Spend­ing: $2,180,060*

  • Estim­ated spend­ing by Judi­cial Fair­ness PAC: $2,137,390
  • Estim­ated spend­ing by Gisela Triana: $42,670

*Spend­ing figures last updated Novem­ber 10, 2020

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Advert­ise­ments


Septem­ber 30 – Heroes

Stream video (QT)

This ad shows an image of medical profes­sions and then says that “heroes on the front lines stepped up to serve. They need a cham­pion on the bench like Nathan Hecht.”

Spon­sor: Judi­cial Fair­ness PAC

Estim­ated Spend­ing: $1,031,400


Septem­ber 30 – Honors

Stream video (QT)

This ad says that Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court Nathan Hecht “shares values with his fellow Repub­lican Judges on the Court.”

Spon­sor: Judi­cial Fair­ness PAC

Estim­ated Spend­ing: $1,105,990


Octo­ber 22 – Like Many of You

Stream video (QT)

In this ad, Gisela Triana says “like many of you, I’m a work­ing mom.” She goes on to say “my job is to provide equal justice to all. Protect­ing our famil­ies, protect­ing our rights.”

Spon­sor: Gisela Triana

Estim­ated Spend­ing: $42,670