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Countering Violent Extremism in the Trump Era

Countering Violent Extremism programs already harmed minority communities without providing any national security benefit. The Trump administration has made the problem far worse.

Published: June 15, 2018

Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism (CVE) programs have a long and troubled history, from before and includ­ing the Obama White House. These programs unfairly target Muslim and minor­ity communit­ies as inher­ently suscept­ible to terror­ism. They conflate community services and intel­li­gence gath­er­ing, often under false pretenses, under­min­ing trust between law enforce­ment and communit­ies. And there is no evid­ence that they provide any national secur­ity bene­fit, which is unsur­pris­ing since they rely on theor­ies and assump­tions about terror­ism that have been empir­ic­ally disproven.

The ascen­sion of the openly Islamo­phobic Trump admin­is­tra­tion has only deepened concerns about how CVE programs could be used to target vulner­able communit­ies. Our analysis of CVE grants awar­ded by Trump’s Depart­ment of Home­land Secur­ity found that those fears are warran­ted. CVE programs now expli­citly oper­ate on the bizarre and unsup­por­ted assump­tion that diversity and the exper­i­ence of discrim­in­a­tion in Amer­ica are suggest­ive of a national secur­ity threat – and that Muslim, immig­rant, black, or LGBTQ Amer­ic­ans, from kinder­garten on, must be surveilled to keep our coun­try safe.


Key Find­ings

Read our key find­ings on the Trump admin­is­tra­tion’s changes to the CVE Grant program. Those include:

  • At least 85% of CVE grants, and over half of CVE programs, now expli­citly target minor­ity groups, includ­ing Muslims, LGBTQ Amer­ic­ans, Black Lives Matter Activ­ists, immig­rants, and refugees.
  • The amount of CVE fund­ing going to law enforce­ment has tripled, from $764,000 to $2,340,000.
  • 14 of the 26 programs funded by the Depart­ment of Home­land Secur­ity target schools and students, some as young as 5 years old – often encour­aging them to report suspi­cious beha­vior by parents or fellow students.

 Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism Grants by City

  Meth­od­o­logy

Cali­for­nia

Los Angeles, CA (Los Angeles Mayor’s Office)

Los Angeles, CA (National Consor­tium for Advanced Poli­cing)

Oakland, CA (Alameda County Sher­iff’s Office)

San Diego, CA (Univer­sity of San Diego)
 

Color­ado

Denver, CO (Denver Police Depart­ment)

Green­wood Village, CO (Peace Cata­lyst Inter­na­tional)
 

District of Columbia

Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (Amer­ica Abroad Media)

Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (Masjid Muhammad)

Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (National Governors Asso­ci­ation Center for Best Prac­tices)
 

Illinois

Chicago, IL (Illinois Crim­inal Justice Inform­a­tion Author­ity)
 

Massachu­setts

Boston, MA (Police Found­a­tion)

Boston, MA (Massachu­setts Office of Public Safety and Secur­ity)
 

Michigan

Dear­born, MI (Dear­born Police Depart­ment)

Minnesota

Minneapolis, MN (Heart­land Demo­cracy)

Minneapolis, MN (Hennepin County Sher­iff’s Office)
 

Nebraska

Lincoln, NE (Nebraska Emer­gency Manage­ment Agency)
 

Nevada

Las Vegas, NV (Las Vegas Metro­pol­itan Police Depart­ment)
 

New Jersey

Jersey City, NJ (Global Peace Found­a­tion)
 

New York

New York, NY (Tues­day’s Chil­dren)

New York, NY (Counter Extrem­ism Project)

Rochester, NY (Rochester Insti­tute of Tech­no­logy)
 

Tennessee

Nashville, TN (Nashville Inter­na­tional Center for Empower­ment)
 

Texas

Arling­ton, TX (Arling­ton Police Depart­ment)

Hous­ton, TX (Hous­ton Mayor’s Office)

Hous­ton, TX (Crisis Inter­ven­tion of Hous­ton)
 

Wash­ing­ton

Seattle, WA (Seattle Police Depart­ment)

 


Use

All docu­ments asso­ci­ated with this project may be repro­duced in whole or in part as long as the Bren­nan Center is cred­ited, a link to the Center’s web page is provided, and no charge is imposed. Please let the Bren­nan Center know if you repro­duce any piece of the project.

Addi­tional Resources

CVE Lexicon: This chart includes defin­i­tions of the key terms used by CVE proponents in the United States. The defin­i­tions in the lexicon were derived from a vari­ety of open source mater­i­als and unclas­si­fied docu­ments.

Terror­ism Indic­at­ors Chart: A compen­dium of the vari­ous mark­ers of vulner­ab­il­ity to terror­ism iden­ti­fied by CVE programs.

CVE Fund­ing Chart: This chart compares the fund­ing alloc­ated to groups receiv­ing DHS CVE fund­ing in the Obama and Trump admin­is­tra­tions. The chart is divided into police depart­ments, non-profit organ­iz­a­tions, academic or research insti­tu­tions, Muslim grass­roots organ­iz­a­tions, and public safety organ­iz­a­tions. Organ­iz­a­tions that publicly declined fund­ing after the 2016 Pres­id­en­tial Elec­tion are high­lighted.

 


Note on Meth­od­o­logy

We have categor­ized the programs funded by DHS based on the types of activ­it­ies they perform, and a single grant may encom­pass more than one activ­ity. The five categor­ies used are:

  1. Inter­ven­tion: Identi­fy­ing indi­vidu­als as poten­tial terror­ists mostly based on vague and unproven indic­at­ors, such as feel­ings of alien­a­tion, exper­i­ence of racism or discrim­in­a­tion, diffi­culties in school or career, search­ing for sense of mean­ing or community, bully­ing, and economic hard­ship. These programs gener­ally involve train­ing people who are likely to come into contact with young people, includ­ing school­teach­ers, to spot these signs. Once such indi­vidu­als are iden­ti­fied, these programs often provide or refer them to coun­sel­ing or mental health care, a process that almost always involves law enforce­ment. Some inter­ven­tion programs do not include a refer­ral element, but rather focus on a “train the trainer” model.
  2. Social Services: Programs to fund or facil­it­ate the provi­sion of health, educa­tion, and social services to Amer­ican Muslim and other communit­ies, based on the theory that adverse economic and social condi­tions facil­it­ate terror­ism. Social services may also be part of an inter­ven­tion program as described above.
  3. CVE Online: Efforts to create or promote messages that are thought to counter the appeal of groups like ISIS and encour­age report­ing of so-called “extrem­ist content” so that it can be removed from the Inter­net.
  4. Community Outreach: Tradi­tional approaches to build­ing rela­tion­ships between law enforce­ment and communit­ies, such as visits by police to community events and houses of worship.
  5. Derad­ic­al­iz­a­tion: Meas­ures aimed at currently or formerly incar­cer­ated indi­vidu­als iden­ti­fied as at risk of viol­ent extrem­ism, such as support services and coun­sel­ing upon release. 

Although DHS did not request recom­mend­a­tions as part of grant applic­a­tions, some grantees incor­por­ated letters of support as part of their CVE propos­als. For complete­ness we have iden­ti­fied these support­ers in our analysis.

The organ­iz­a­tions and indi­vidu­als listed as part­ners, pass-through organ­iz­a­tions, consult­ants, and support­ers are consist­ent with those listed in the grant propos­als as submit­ted to DHS. We recog­nize that some of the listed entit­ies may have since declined fund­ing or stopped parti­cip­a­tion.

A number of grantees also received grant awards that differed from the funds reques­ted in their grant propos­als. We resolved this discrep­ancy by report­ing funds awar­ded to each program by then-DHS secret­ary John Kelly in June 2017.

Finally, several DHS CVE programs are nation­wide or statewide in their reach; they are nonethe­less listed accord­ing to the city in which the headquar­ters of the grantee is located. For example, the Global Peace Found­a­tion’s program has a statewide focus, but in the accom­pa­ny­ing grant proposal the organ­iz­a­tion listed Jersey City as the site of their headquar­ters, so we have listed it as such.

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Los Angeles, CA (Los Angeles Mayor’s Office) 

This page is part of the research project 'Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism in the Trump Era.' Click here to go back.

Name of Program: Build­ing Healthy Communit­ies in Los Angeles.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Social Service; CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Public Safety.

Grant Amount: $425,000.

Targets: Based on part­ners: Muslims, Sikhs, immig­rants, refugees, young people, and formerly incar­cer­ated people.

Key Facts: The program is meant to prevent Muslim and refugee communit­ies and formerly incar­cer­ated indi­vidu­als from adopt­ing extrem­ist ideo­lo­gies. The initi­at­ive will facil­it­ate roundtable CVE discus­sions among community members and create a system for schools, communit­ies, local organ­iz­a­tions, law enforce­ment, and city and county services to identify indi­vidu­als who do not pose an “immin­ent public safety threat,” but are suscept­ible to terror­ist recruit­ment. These indi­vidu­als may be referred to “multidiscip­lin­ary services,” such as mental health, educa­tion, and job place­ment services. In running the program, the Mayor’s Office will part­ner with the county’s School Threat Response Team (START) program, which aims to combine mental health and law enforce­ment expert­ise to identify, eval­u­ate, or arrest indi­vidu­als who may pose a “crim­inal threat” or a “more advanced threat to public safety.” The indic­at­ors for identi­fy­ing students as a threat are not specified.

The mayor’s office will create an online inform­a­tion resource plat­form (the “Commun­et­work”) to connect community part­ners to groups that provide skills-based train­ing and other social and mental health services to members of the Los Angeles community. In addi­tion, the program plans to launch a messaging campaign to change the percep­tion that CVE is always connec­ted with law enforce­ment in cooper­a­tion with private sector part­ners.

The proposal states that the refer­ral system will ensure “privacy of indi­vidual inform­a­tion and protec­tion of civil rights,” but does not specify how it intends to do so.

The RAND Corpor­a­tion is to build eval­u­at­ive meas­ures to assess the effect­ive­ness and impact of the refer­ral system, and to ensure program outcomes are success­fully completed, but the criteria for success are not defined.

Part­ners: City of Los Angeles Human Rela­tions Commis­sion, Los Angeles Depart­ment of Mental Health, Inter­agency Collab­or­at­ive Steer­ing Commit­tee, Los Angeles Inter­agency Coordin­a­tion Group, Muslim Public Affairs Coun­cil, King Fahad Mosque, Not in our Town, ILM Found­a­tion, Viol­ence Preven­tion Coali­tion, Gang Reduc­tion & Youth Devel­op­ment Found­a­tion, Profes­sional Community Inter­ven­tion Train­ing Insti­tute, LA Emer­gency Prepared­ness Found­a­tion Access Services, Tiyya Found­a­tion, Cali­for­nia Sikh Coun­cil, Univer­sity of South­ern Cali­for­nia Center for Reli­gion and Civic Culture, City of Los Angeles Human Rela­tions Commis­sion, Bayan Clare­mont Univer­sity, Film2­Fu­ture, EdVen­ture Part­ners, RAND Corpor­a­tion.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: RAND Corpor­a­tion ($80,000); ILM Found­a­tion, Not in Our Town, Tiyya Found­a­tion, Cross Cultural Expres­sions Community Coun­sel­ing Center, and others ($195,000 to support CVE activ­it­ies).[1]

Consult­ants: Unnamed vendor for web-based plat­form ($25,000); refer­ral system ($50,000); messaging and brand­ing ($20,000).

Support­ers: 211 LA County, Ahmadiyya Muslim Community (National), Bayan Clare­mont – Islamic Gradu­ate School, County of Los Angeles – Office of Emer­gency Manage­ment, Film2­Fu­ture, Home­boy Indus­tries, Los Angeles Human Rela­tions Coordin­ator, King Fahad Mosque, EdVen­ture Part­ner, Los Angeles Emer­gency Manage­ment Found­a­tion Access Services, Los Angeles Police Depart­ment, Muslim Public Affairs Coun­cil, Not in our Town, Profes­sional Community Inter­ven­tion Train­ing Insti­tute (a gang inter­ven­tion train­ing organ­iz­a­tion), Viol­ence Preven­tion Coali­tion of Los Angeles, Cali­for­nia Sikh Coun­cil, ILM Found­a­tion, UMMA Community Clinic.

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[1] The Muslim Public Affairs Coun­cil was on the initial list of organ­iz­a­tions slated to receive fund­ing, but was not included in the City Admin­is­trat­ive Officer’s report from Decem­ber 2017. MPAC has informed the Bren­nan Center that they declined to parti­cip­ate. The report also indic­ated that Cross Cultural Expres­sions Community Coun­sel­ing Center has received fund­ing related to activ­it­ies outlined in the program proposal.  


Los Angeles, CA (National Consor­tium for Advanced Poli­cing)

Name of Program: Build­ing Community Resi­li­ency Through Police and Community Part­ner­ships

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].    

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/ Research.

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Grant Amount: $200,000.

Targets: Police in urban communit­ies nation­wide.

Key Facts: This program aims to increase aware­ness and know­ledge among police officers about coun­ter­ing the threat of viol­ent extrem­ism in the communit­ies they serve. The Consor­tium will train police exec­ut­ives from the 66 largest metro areas in the coun­try, who will require their entire depart­ments to parti­cip­ate in future train­ings. The train­ing curriculum is to be developed with input from the Consor­tium, DHS, and the 66 police chiefs, along with at least one community leader from each of the police chief’s communit­ies. It will address a range of topics includ­ing “how viol­ent extrem­ism mani­fests itself in local communit­ies.” The Consor­tium will also develop an “imple­ment­a­tion guide” to reach officers beyond the 66 agen­cies.

Accord­ing to the proposal, all CVE train­ing for police person­nel is to be “free from bias” and “uphold civil rights and liber­ties.”

Train­ing eval­u­ations, presum­ably under­taken by the Consor­tium, will include detailed data collec­tion and analysis using input from an advis­ory board, a pilot train­ing, after action reports, and student eval­u­ation forms. “Meas­ur­able outcomes” include parti­cipants’ under­stand­ing of “what viol­ent extrem­ism is and how it mani­fests itself in local communit­ies”; “how community poli­cing strategies can be used to develop a safety net of rela­tion­ships that can lead to early detec­tion and preven­tion”; and “how each muni­cip­al­ity plays a role.”

Part­ners: Major Cities Chiefs Asso­ci­ation.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Lafay­ette Group ($92,873), Major Cities Chief Asso­ci­ation ($34,709).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Oakland, CA (Alameda County Sher­iff’s Office)

Name of Program: Oper­a­tion E Pluribus Unum.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Derad­ic­al­iz­a­tion; Social Service; Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.

Grant Amount: $499,125.

Targets: Indi­vidu­als currently or recently incar­cer­ated in Alameda County, primar­ily Muslims and “people inter­ested in explor­ing Islam.” The grant proposal claims that it covers inmates iden­ti­fied as being “at-risk of radic­al­iz­a­tion by other ideo­lo­gies,” but program activ­it­ies are clearly targeted at Muslims.

Key Facts: Oper­a­tion E Pluribus Unum was created to address the lack of cultur­ally relev­ant reentry services for Muslim inmates in Alameda County jails, a group that, accord­ing to the sher­iff’s office, is “suscept­ible to extrem­ist ideo­logy.” The office will support the reentry of 60 inmates and 60 post-release clients iden­ti­fied as “at-risk for extrem­ist recruit­ment,” based on unspe­cified criteria, by a refer­ral network that they will set up with the Ta’Leef Collect­ive. Licensed clini­cians from Ta’Leef will provide these indi­vidu­als with trauma-informed one-on-one coun­sel­ing and work­shops on topics such as “trans­form[ing] viol­ent mind­sets and beha­vi­ors” and “radic­al­iz­a­tion within Islamic under­stand­ing.” Parti­cipants are eligible for paid trans­itional employ­ment with primar­ily Muslim-owned busi­nesses through the Deputy Sher­iff’s Activ­it­ies League. Ta’Leef also intends to provide work­shops for law enforce­ment and reentry case managers to increase their under­stand­ing of “Muslim community issues,” as well as “factors poten­tially lead­ing to radic­al­iz­a­tion and viol­ent extrem­ism.”

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Parti­cipants will complete pre- and post-eval­u­ation surveys to assess program impacts, includ­ing “changes in compas­sion, empathy, and impuls­iv­ity.” Surveys for law enforce­ment and case managers will meas­ure “under­stand­ing of key issues for Muslims both in the community and the correc­tions system” and “know­ledge of resources to support Muslim clients.” An outside eval­u­ator Action Research Inter­na­tional will create an “innov­at­ive, cross-systems eval­u­ation plan” to assess changes in rela­tion­ships among case managers, clini­cians, inmates and reentry clients, and correc­tions staff and whether that “correl­ates to reduced recidiv­ism and changes in atti­tudes.”

Part­ners: Ta’leef Collect­ive, Deputy Sher­iff’s Activ­it­ies League, Santa Rita Jail, Glenn Dyer Deten­tion Facil­ity, Crim­inal Justice Mental Health, Roots Community Health and Mirchi Café, and uniden­ti­fied Muslim-owned busi­nesses and Alameda County Agen­cies and Part­ners.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Action Research Inter­na­tional, the organ­iz­a­tion eval­u­at­ing the program ($73,750) and Deputy Sher­iff’s Activ­it­ies League ($110,000), compris­ing stipends for Muslim-owned busi­nesses and other local enter­prises, such as Dig Deep Farms ($500-$3000 per stipend).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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San Diego, CA (Univer­sity of San Diego)

Detailed Program Inform­a­tionAvail­able here

Name of Program: Connec­ted Youth-Resi­li­ent Communit­ies Initi­at­ive.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/Research.

Type of Program: Community Outreach; Social Service.

Grant Amount: $634,769.

Targets: Somali, Iraqi, and refugee youth in San Diego and El Cajon, CA.

Key Facts: Premised on the belief that “margin­al­iz­a­tion and isol­a­tion of youth” is the core prob­lem under­min­ing community resi­li­ence to viol­ent extrem­ism, this program seeks to better integ­rate Somali and Iraqi refugee youth into their communit­ies in San Diego and El Cajon. A “project team,” the member­ship of which is not specified, will work to build the capa­city of community-based organ­iz­a­tions through train­ing, obser­va­tion, and the alloc­a­tion of sub-grants. These organ­iz­a­tions will help the young people with whom they work to build connec­tions with their elders, school peers, and law enforce­ment, and facil­it­ate youth collab­or­a­tion on community-based projects (ranging from school clean-up day to “a series of community-police dialogues”).

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

The Insti­tute for Peace and Justice at the Univer­sity of San Diego will eval­u­ate the programs object­ives and outcomes, (e.g., “youth voice” and “youth collab­or­a­tion”; “increased effic­acy,” “strengthened rela­tion­ships”; increased “work­ing trust,” “sense of community,” “place attach­ment”; “youth less amen­able to recruit­ment” and “communit­ies more resi­li­ent to viol­ent extrem­ism,” through surveys and focus groups. The program aims to use its eval­u­ation meth­od­o­logy to create a model that can be imple­men­ted in other loca­tions through­out the coun­try. 

Part­ners: San Ysidro Health Center – Chaldean and Middle-East­ern Social Services, Somali Bantu Community of San Diego; Horn of Africa Community in North Amer­ica; and East African Youth Empower­ment.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: San Ysidro Health Center ($247,105); contracts with “members of the consor­tium of Somali organ­iz­a­tions” ($100,000).

Consult­ants: Somali community program coordin­ator ($150,000); unnamed consult­ant for data collec­tion and analysis ($30,000).

Support­ers: Somali Bantu Asso­ci­ation of Amer­ica, Horn of Africa Community in North Amer­ica, and East African Youth Empower­ment.

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Denver, CO (Denver Police Depart­ment)

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Name of Program: Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism Collab­or­at­ive Grant Program.

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Community Outreach.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.   

Grant Amount: $481,313.

Targets: Faith communit­ies, diverse communit­ies, refugee communit­ies, LGBTQ communit­ies and Black Lives Matter in Denver.

Key Facts: The program is premised on the notion that Denver’s ethnic/reli­gious minor­it­ies and other margin­al­ized groups are suscept­ible to viol­ent extrem­ism because they are disen­fran­chised and isol­ated. To address this threat, 240 police officers will be trained to recog­nize and analyze unspe­cified “beha­vi­ors and indic­at­ors of viol­ent extrem­ism,” and to part­ner with community organ­iz­a­tions to inter­vene. Officer train­ing will be developed with input from DHS, the National Coun­terter­ror­ism Center, the Depart­ment of Justice, the Denver Police Academy, Color­ado Muslim Connec­tion, and uniden­ti­fied community members. The proposal also states that DHS and the U.S. Attor­ney Gener­al’s Office will assist in the devel­op­ment of this program. Officers will lead CVE- specific “ment­or­ing” programs in five unnamed Denver public middle and high schools for students iden­ti­fied as “at-risk” by school coun­selors, teach­ers, community part­ners, or the crim­inal justice system. These will be suppor­ted by Good­will Indus­tries, a non-profit organ­iz­a­tion. Finally, officers will conduct work­shops with immig­rants and refugees, which aim to integ­rate them into city life, teach them to recog­nize “the signs and tactics of radic­al­iz­a­tion,” and increase the like­li­hood that they will report “suspi­cion of radic­al­iz­a­tion” to law enforce­ment or other city agen­cies.

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy. It states that the police will enter into memor­anda of under­stand­ing with part­ner schools, but provides no inform­a­tion on what these will cover.

Two data managers will track parti­cipant inform­a­tion and eval­u­ate program outcomes, gath­er­ing data such as the number of classes, unspe­cified “parti­cipant data,” demo­graph­ics, classroom contact hours, attend­ance, support­ive services, volun­teers and hours, and descrip­tion of activ­it­ies that occurred during the report­ing period. Also, officers will take pre- and post-course eval­u­ations to meas­ure their “under­stand­ing of imple­ment­a­tion of the curriculum and concepts of the course.”

Part­ners: Good­will Indus­tries, Denver Office of Immig­rant & Refugee Affairs, Color­ado Muslim Connec­tion, Denver Agency for Human Rights and Community Part­ner­ships, Denver Public Schools, DHS Office of Stra­tegic Engage­ment, and the U.S. Attor­neys’ Office.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Good­will Indus­tries ($132,362); Denver Office of Immig­rant & Refugee Affairs ($14,990).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Green­wood Village, CO (Peace Cata­lyst Inter­na­tional)

Name of Program: Faith Communit­ies Under­min­ing Recip­rocal Extrem­ist Narrat­ives.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $95,000.

Targets: Muslim and Evan­gel­ical faith/community lead­ers.

Key Facts: This program aims to disrupt the recip­rocal radic­al­iz­a­tion ideo­lo­gies of both “Islamic viol­ent extrem­ists” and “Anti-Muslim viol­ent extrem­ists.” Peace Cata­lyst will host two confer­ences at Duke Univer­sity to connect Muslim community lead­ers with lead­ers in the Evan­gel­ical community. The primary goal of the first confer­ence is to form work­ing groups to organ­ize “local activ­a­tions,” cross-faith initi­at­ives in cities around the coun­try that will under­take conflict resol­u­tion train­ings, cross-cultural programs, and community service events, in an effort to create a “lived-exper­i­ence” counter-narrat­ive to viol­ent extrem­ist recruit­ing. During a follow-up confer­ence, parti­cipants will eval­u­ate the successes and short­com­ings of local activ­a­tions and their initi­at­ives.  

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

The work­ing groups will construct and imple­ment eval­u­ations for the local activ­a­tions. Confer­ence parti­cipants will eval­u­ate “local activ­a­tion strategies,” although specific mech­an­isms are not discussed. The results of these eval­u­ations will be dissem­in­ated nation­wide to faith-based prac­ti­tion­ers.

Part­ners: Duke Univer­sity Center for Recon­cili­ation, Alli­ance for Peace­build­ing, Center for Islam and Reli­gious Free­dom, Insti­tute for Global Engage­ment, Inter­na­tional Center for Reli­gion and Diplomacy, The Shoulder to Shoulder Campaign, Evan­gel­ic­als for Peace.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed speak­ers ($6,000) and local program train­ers ($4,500). Unspe­cified “other contracts” ($1,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (Amer­ica Abroad Media)

Name of Program: The Disrupters.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $647,546.

Targets: Muslim content creat­ors in Minneapolis, New York, and Los Angeles.

Key Facts: This program is premised on the notion that ISIS’s “slick” and “soph­ist­ic­ated” online recruit­ment is rapidly outpa­cing the counter-messaging campaigns led by govern­ments, civil soci­ety, and reli­gious lead­ers. In response, Amer­ica Abroad Media, with project part­ners Affinis Labs and RL Lead­ers, will connect Muslim and non-Muslim creat­ive artists through a series of compet­i­tions (“hack­a­thons”) to develop authen­tic, community-based commu­nic­a­tions campaigns and content to disrupt viol­ent extrem­ist narrat­ives. The winning teams of each compet­i­tion will work with enter­tain­ment industry profes­sion­als in Holly­wood to fully develop and execute their campaigns, in hopes that these campaigns will inspire the creation of others.

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Amer­ica Abroad Media and its part­ners will help the winner of each compet­i­tion eval­u­ate “the volume and reach of content that their work inspires and enables,” using tradi­tional social media metrics (e.g., clicks, views, tweets/retweets), as well as metrics that track user engage­ment such as “instances where content clearly produces discus­sions or debates about whether viol­ent extrem­ism is permiss­ible.” Content proto­types will be eval­u­ated based on four criteria: tech­nical feas­ib­il­ity, creativ­ity, impact on target audi­ences, and the extent to which the proto­type encour­ages others to make CVE content.

Part­ners: Affinis Labs, RL Lead­ers, Salam Al-Maray­ati (Muslim Public Affairs Coun­cil), Munir Shaikh (Bayan), Rushdi Cader (Trauma Assist­ance Train­ing), Omar Ricci (Reserve Police Officer, Los Angeles Police Depart­ment), Haroon Moghul (Center for Global Policy); Oz Sultan (Sultan Inter­act­ive), Zeba Iqbal (Former Exec. Director, Coun­cil for the Advance­ment of Muslim Profes­sion­als); and Zaheer Baber (former Regional Director-Land O’Lakes), Mary McKin­ley (Heart­land Demo­cracy), Hashi Shafi (Somali Action Alli­ance), and Moha­mad Farah (Ka Joog).

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Affinis Labs ($208,061) and RL Lead­ers ($154,387).

Consult­ants: Unnamed virtual ment­or­ing consult­ants from the enter­tain­ment industry ($12,000), consult­ants for “industry hack­a­thon” ($27,500), contractor for hack­a­thon live stream ($10,500), contractor for design­ers to “support team mock ups” ($7,500).

Support­ers: Office of Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY), Pound Sand, Trio Enter­tain­ment, Aaron Sims Creat­ive, Produ­cer Kearie Peak, and HQ Creat­ive.

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Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (Masjid Muhammad)

Name of Program: Devel­op­ing Cred­ible, Authen­tic and Construct­ive Muslim Voices to Prevent Extrem­ism.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online.  

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount:  $531,195.

Targets: Muslims in the D.C. region and nation­wide.

Key Facts: Accord­ing to the grant proposal, there is a grow­ing threat of viol­ent extrem­ism among Muslims in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. and nation­ally. As evid­ence, the proposal cites recruit­ment at a local mosque and the pres­ence of Salafi Muslims in the D.C. region, which it describes as a sect “often cited as a precursor to extrem­ist ideo­logy and beha­vior.” Masjid Muhammed, in collab­or­a­tion with counter-terror­ism experts, Amer­ican Islamic schol­ars, and mosques and reli­gious centers, will develop a national online plat­form, as well as a speak­ing tour, to counter online viol­ent extrem­ist recruit­ment with “authen­tic” and “cred­ible” Muslim voices. The website presents altern­at­ive narrat­ives and provides resources to help indi­vidu­als “headed down a path of destruc­tion,” includ­ing a page of poten­tial signs of viol­ent extrem­ism that may warrant inter­ven­tion. Separ­ately, Masjid Muhammad runs a 24-hour crisis hotline where people can discuss “a personal issue related to radic­al­iz­a­tion.” The program also includes an in-depth geotar­get­ing campaign aimed at reach­ing certain “demo­graph­ics, genders, interests, languages, and bound­ary areas” with “anti-radic­al­iz­a­tion digital media” via mobile phones. The program, with the help of unnamed CVE experts, will work with local mosques to “identify high risk groups within their communit­ies.” It is not clear whether inform­a­tion about their targets will be shared with law enforce­ment.  

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

The proposal states that with the assist­ance of Greene Street Commu­nic­a­tions, the program is to provide an analytic report of daily parti­cip­a­tion rates on social media and the website, as well as a compre­hens­ive assess­ment of online analyt­ics, best prac­tices, current trends, and post community engage­ment work­shops.

Part­ners: Greene Street Commu­nic­a­tion LLC, Amer­ica’s Islamic Herit­age Museum & Cultural Center, Haneefiya Amer­ica, Center D.C., All Dulles Area Muslim Soci­ety (ADAMS), Muslim Community Cultural Center of Baltimore and Islamic Affairs Coun­cil of Mary­land/Civil­iz­a­tion Exchange and Cooper­a­tion Found­a­tion, and D.C. Police.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed app developers ($50,000); market­ing consult­ants ($6,000);  “[g]eotar­get­ing CVE experts to target risk demo­graph­ics” ($50,000); consult­ant to produce “rapid assess­ment study/report on CVE issues” ($72,000); “CVE experts to write articles for site” ($96,000); video and edit­ing post produc­tion team ($48,000); photo­grapher consult­ant ($19,200); CVE commu­nic­a­tions expert ($40,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied

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Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (National Governors Asso­ci­ation Center for Best Prac­tices)

Name of Program: State Approaches to Viol­ent Extrem­ism (S.A.V.E.) Policy Academy.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/ Research.

Grant Amount: $500,000.

Targets: Governors who will imple­ment the program’s “CVE Roadmap.”

Key Facts: Accord­ing to the grant proposal, there is a need for greater coordin­a­tion between differ­ent levels of govern­ment and discip­lines to counter the threat of viol­ent extrem­ism. With ongo­ing input and support from DHS, the Center will develop and imple­ment a CVE “roadmap” to provide train­ing, policy, and engage­ment strategies to be imple­men­ted and adop­ted by five states. To initially engage and train states, the Center will conduct a “policy academy,” that will address a range of topics includ­ing “recog­niz­ing viol­ent extrem­ist beha­vi­ors and indic­at­ors,” which are not specified in the grant proposal. The program also anti­cip­ates devel­op­ing mater­i­als for use by state govern­ments beyond the five selec­ted to imple­ment the roadmap.

The CVE roadmap will include unspe­cified civil rights and civil liber­ties protec­tions.

Through regu­lar commu­nic­a­tion and engage­ment with selec­ted states, the Center will track progress and ensure project goals are met. Criteria used to meas­ure success include community engage­ments, the creation of bodies (e.g., a task force or coun­cil), evid­ence-based train­ings to communit­ies, devel­op­ment of a single report­ing mech­an­ism, and/or aware­ness campaigns.

Part­ners: Coun­cil of State Govern­ments, National Governors Asso­ci­ation, National Confer­ence of State Legis­latures, National League of Cities, U.S. Confer­ence of Mayors, National Asso­ci­ation of Counties, and Inter­na­tional City/County Manage­ment Asso­ci­ation, National Asso­ci­ation of City and County Health Offi­cials, Univer­sity of Mary­land, Amer­ican Red Cross, and Busi­ness Exec­ut­ives for National Secur­ity.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Five unnamed states ($50,000).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Chicago, IL (Illinois Crim­inal Justice Inform­a­tion Author­ity)

Name of Program: Targeted Viol­ence Preven­tion Program.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Public Safety.

Grant Amount: $187,877.

Targets: 150 community lead­ers and community members in Chicago, DuPage County, and the greater Spring­field area.

Key Facts: Accord­ing to the grant proposal, this program was created in response to the prolif­er­a­tion of hate groups/ hate crimes and “Illinois-affil­i­ated terror­ism incid­ents” (involving indi­vidu­als previ­ously resid­ing in Illinois). The Illinois Crim­inal Justice Inform­a­tion Author­ity will train community lead­ers from schools, faith-based, and community organ­iz­a­tions (who will train community members) to identify indi­vidu­als who exhibit warn­ing signs of extrem­ist involve­ment and to off-ramp them via connec­tion or refer­ral to uniden­ti­fied resources within their communit­ies. The project has been developed “along­side, but inde­pend­ent of,” a compan­ion proposal by the Illinois Depart­ment of Public Health and Illinois Depart­ment of Mental Health, which plans to provide unspe­cified CVE train­ing to mental health providers in the same three pilot communit­ies.

The grant proposal states that “build­ing resi­li­ence and prevent­ing ideo­lo­gic­ally inspired targeted viol­ence is not inher­ently at odds with indi­vidual civil liber­ties,” but does not address poten­tial impacts or safe­guards.  

There is no plan for a formal eval­u­ation, but the program will “collect evid­ence of both process and outcomes” that can be eval­u­ated through later research. Mentioned informal “eval­u­ation activ­it­ies” include focus groups to assess parti­cipants’ percep­tions of the program and pre- and post-train­ing surveys to “record attendee char­ac­ter­ist­ics, gauge know­ledge attain­ment and satis­fac­tion with the train­ing, and docu­ment parti­cipant percep­tions about whether the train­ing increased their like­li­hood of acting when they view concern­ing beha­vi­ors.”

Part­ners: Makki Masjid, Chicago Police Depart­ment, Islamic Center of Naperville, DuPage County Office of Home­land Secur­ity and Emer­gency Manage­ment—Med­ical Reserve Corps, Islamic Soci­ety of Greater Spring­field, Coun­cil of Reli­gious Lead­ers of Metro­pol­itan Chicago, Compas­sion­ate Care Network, and Parlia­ment of the World’s Reli­gions.

Consult­ants: Dr. Stevan Weine, Dr. Nancy Zarse, Dr. Linda Lang­ford, Dr. Matthew Clarke, and Sadia Covert (total $90,800).

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Boston, MA (Police Found­a­tion) 

Name of Program: Youth and Police Initi­at­ive Plus (YPIP).

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Community Outreach; Social Service; poten­tially Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/ Research.

Grant Amount: $484,835.

Targets: 120 Somali immig­rant youth and their famil­ies in Boston’s Roxbury neigh­bor­hood.

Key Facts: The program is premised on the view that young Somali-Amer­ican men are at risk of enga­ging in viol­ent extrem­ism due to a vari­ety of factors, includ­ing recruit­ing efforts by Al Shabab and ISIS, disen­fran­chise­ment, and mistrust of law enforce­ment. To coun­ter­act this risk, police will work in collab­or­a­tion with two community groups, the North Amer­ican Family Insti­tute and the Somali Community and Cultural Asso­ci­ation. They will conduct a number of activ­it­ies focused on young Somalis, includ­ing inter­act­ive train­ing sessions aimed at build­ing mutual respect, pair­ing parti­cipants with adult Somali ment­ors, and, where neces­sary, link­ing parti­cipants to social and mental health services. The program will recruit youth parti­cipants through word of mouth, social media, flyers shared during sermon pray­ers, and “work­ing closely with area mosques.” The program will also under­take parent engage­ment initi­at­ives for Somali famil­ies, includ­ing “parent/police trust-build­ing & info-shar­ing sessions.” Officers parti­cip­at­ing in this program are expec­ted to share inform­a­tion regard­ing known terror­ism recruit­ment with the Somali Community and Cultural Asso­ci­ation to “better inform” Somali parents in Boston. The grant proposal does not specific­ally indic­ate that the program is aimed at identi­fy­ing indi­vidual Somalis as at risk for viol­ent extrem­ism. However, it lists a number of factors (e.g. weak parental support, “abso­lute trust” in people who attend community mosques, and unsafe neigh­bor­hoods) as relev­ant to such a determ­in­a­tion and meas­ures youth “atti­tudes towards ideo­logy-based viol­ence by others and own viol­ent inten­tions,” which suggests that such eval­u­ations are part of YPIP.

The proposal states that memor­anda of under­stand­ing and other unspe­cified policies will be estab­lished at the outset of the project to protect parti­cipants’ civil rights and liber­ties, but does not include specific inform­a­tion.

The Police Found­a­tion will under­take an eval­u­ation via pre- and post-program surveys of youth and officers to assess short and long-term effects of program parti­cip­a­tion. The youth surveys will meas­ure “opin­ions towards police officers, indi­vidual and collect­ive relat­ive depriva­tion, social discon­nec­ted­ness, and atti­tudes towards ideo­logy-based viol­ence by others and own viol­ent inten­tions.” The criteria for police surveys are unspe­cified, although the proposal states that they were adap­ted from a 2014 Depart­ment of Justice-funded study.  

Part­ners: North Amer­ican Family Insti­tute, Boston Police Depart­ment, Somali Community and Cultural Asso­ci­ation.

Consult­ants: Deeqo Jibril (Somali Community Liaison) ($350/day up to 200 days/year), Slonky (web-host­ing and main­ten­ance company) ($4,000/year); unnamed video produc­tion company ($4,000/year).

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: North Amer­ican Family Insti­tute ($162,200).

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Boston, MA (Massachu­setts Office of Public Safety and Secur­ity)

Name of Program: New Freedoms Inter­ven­tion

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Derad­ic­al­iz­a­tion; Social Service.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Public Safety.

Grant Amount: $500,000.

Targets: 139 men being released from maximum secur­ity prison in Massachu­setts.

Key Facts: Almost all the funds will be subgran­ted to the state’s Depart­ment of Correc­tion, which will identify 139 recently incar­cer­ated men for parti­cip­a­tion. These indi­vidu­als are regarded as being at heightened risk for viol­ent extrem­ism due to their “high propensity for displaced aggres­sion” (all have been placed in a Depart­ment Discip­lin­ary Unit, have known gang affil­i­ation and/or have had a discip­lin­ary report for viol­ence within the last three years). The Depart­ment will contract with licensed outpa­tient beha­vi­oral health treat­ment centers to provide parti­cipants with direct beha­vi­oral health services and facil­it­ate connec­tions to “cultur­ally-appro­pri­ate pro-social outlets,” educa­tional/employ­ment oppor­tun­it­ies, and other uniden­ti­fied trans­itional services.

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Mentioned eval­u­ation object­ives include meas­ur­ing the percent­age of “indi­vidu­als who engage in community-based treat­ment and support,” “reduc­tions in arrests, convic­tions, and seri­ous (viol­ence-related) offenses,” and the “level of service deliv­ery parti­cip­a­tion.”  Depart­ment of Correc­tion Office of Stra­tegic Plan­ning & Research will provide ongo­ing eval­u­ation of qual­ity of services, program effect­ive­ness and oppor­tun­it­ies for devel­op­ment.

Part­ners: Massachu­setts Depart­ment of Correc­tions, the U.S. Attor­ney’s Office (if needed).

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Massachu­setts Depart­ment of Correc­tions (via an unnamed vendor) ($452,529.64).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Dear­born, MI (Dear­born Police Depart­ment)

Name of Program: Community Train­ing and Aware­ness Brief­ings to Counter Viol­ent Extrem­ism.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.   

Grant Amount: $51,521.

Targets: Arab popu­la­tions in and around Dear­born.

Key Facts: Noting that the city’s dense Arab popu­la­tion and “unique blend of cultural diversity” may make it a target for recruit­ment to viol­ent extrem­ism, Dear­born police are expand­ing their exist­ing CVE “Inter­ven­tion Model.” Inter­ven­tions are triggered when “family, friends, or acquaint­ances are worried about a person’s beha­vior and tips off police.” Police refer the case to the “appro­pri­ate source” (school coun­selor, clergy, psychi­at­ric ward, etc.) and invest­ig­ate whether “there were weapons incid­ents or previ­ous assault­ive beha­vior.” No further inform­a­tion on the process is included in the proposal or the publicly avail­able mater­i­als on Dear­born’s Inter­ven­tion Model.

The expan­sion financed by DHS will include at least 22 officer-led train­ings to teach civil­ians to effect­ively respond to threat­en­ing situ­ations and to recog­nize unspe­cified “disturb­ing beha­vi­ors which warrant non-crim­inal inter­ven­tion” by law enforce­ment and mental health profes­sion­als. In addi­tion, officers will deliver train­ings to uniden­ti­fied schools in Dear­born on how to respond to an active shooter. Other mater­i­als indic­ate that the Dear­born School Super­in­tend­ent Brian Whis­ton “is a co-leader of CVE efforts, and schools are a major part­ner to law enforce­ment.”

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Dear­born Police will eval­u­ate the degree to which the program has “enhanced resi­li­ence to viol­ent extrem­ist recruit­ment and radic­al­iz­a­tion” by track­ing “number of train­ing/aware­ness brief­ings held,” “number of attendees,” and “number of radic­al­iz­a­tion incid­ents.” The grant proposal does not indic­ate how the latter will be iden­ti­fied or recor­ded or how the success of iden­ti­fic­a­tions or inter­ven­tions will be meas­ured.

Part­ners: Dear­born Area Inter­faith Network.

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Minneapolis, MN (Heart­land Demo­cracy)

Name of Program: Empower­ing U.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $423,340.

Targets: Minnesota’s Somali popu­la­tion.

Key Facts: Empower­ing U was estab­lished in response to an increase in terror­ist recruit­ment and “civil unrest” in Minnesota in recent years. The initi­at­ive will run programs in schools to provide “at-risk” students with oppor­tun­it­ies to discuss race, polit­ics, and social issues, in hopes that an outlet for their griev­ances might prevent the adop­tion of extrem­ist ideo­lo­gies. The program will also convene mental health and primary care providers to share and develop cultur­ally compet­ent care and outreach. Heart­land Demo­cracy has a team (the compos­i­tion of which is unknown) which will identify and work with youth and at least three to five famil­ies directly affected by or at risk of recruit­ment and refer them to ment­ors, case managers, educa­tional, health, and social service providers. Although the proposal does not specify the indic­at­ors used in the program’s refer­ral compon­ent, a number of polit­ical, socio-economic, and cultural factors are cited as increas­ing an indi­vidu­al’s risk to terror­ist recruit­ment.

There will be a “memor­andum of under­stand­ing for parti­cipants and service providers; inform­a­tion-shar­ing prac­tices, limits and constraints, civil liber­ties, privacy protec­tions,” the specif­ics of which are not avail­able.

Empower­ing U has developed surveys, in part­ner­ship with the Univer­sity of Minnesota, to eval­u­ate program success in mental health and cogni­tion, although it is not known how these are defined.

Part­ners: African Immig­rants Community Services, Govern­ment Agen­cies in Hennepin County, former U.S. Attor­ney Andrew Luger, Minneapolis Public Schools, Univer­sity of Minnesota’s Depart­ment of Organ­iz­a­tional Lead­er­ship, Policy and Devel­op­ment, and the Minnesota Eval­u­ation Stud­ies Insti­tute, Affinis Labs, Federal Bureau of Invest­ig­a­tion, Minneapolis Cham­ber of Commerce, IBM, Somali-Amer­ican Task Force, Base Manage­ment, Hennepin County Sher­iff’s Office, YWCA of Minneapolis, Girls Inc., Minnesota Human­it­ies Center, AbuBakr Mosque, Aver­age Mohamed, ThinkS­mall, Base Manage­ment, and Federal Bureau of Invest­ig­a­tion.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed educa­tional profes­sional ($30,000); mental health and primary care clini­cians ($30,000); coaches and ment­ors ($30,000); community outreach coordin­ator ($10,000); commu­nic­a­tions and inform­a­tion manage­ment consult­ant ($40,000); trans­la­tion services ($8,000); consult­ant with program assess­ment and eval­u­ation exper­i­ence ($14,400); researcher and writer ($85/hour, 120 hours total); finan­cial manage­ment consult­ant ($50/hour, 100 hours total).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Minneapolis, MN (Hennepin County Sher­iff’s Office)

Name of Program: Community Engage­ment: A Front­line Strategy for Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Community Outreach; CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.  

Grant Amount: $347,600.

Popu­la­tions Targeted: Somali, Liberian, Oromo, East African, Native Amer­ican, and Latino communit­ies in Hennepin County and the Minneapolis area.

Key Facts: The Hennepin County Sher­iff’s Office is expand­ing its exist­ing CVE efforts in response to increases in Minnesota’s non-white and Latino popu­la­tions and an increase in recruit­ment of area resid­ents to ISIS and al Shabaab. The office, in part­ner­ship with community groups, will conduct work­shops with as many as 300 women, chil­dren, and young adults in Minneapol­is’ Cedar River­side neigh­bor­hood to enhance aware­ness of the nature of viol­ent extrem­ist threats, includ­ing signs, not specified in the grant proposal, that purportedly indic­ate adop­tion of extrem­ist ideo­logy, and avail­ab­il­ity of community resources. Liais­ons will conduct outreach to minor­ity communit­ies to develop rela­tion­ships and bridge cultural/language gaps. Addi­tion­ally, the Sher­iff’s Office will imple­ment a version of the London Metro­pol­itan Police Depart­ment’s “Red STOP” program, through which community members can anonym­ously report “extrem­ist inter­net content” to law enforce­ment.

The proposal notes the program’s commit­ment to “protect­ing the civil rights and civil liber­ties” of local communit­ies but does not identify poten­tial risks or safe­guards to be estab­lished.

Eval­u­ations of program effect­ive­ness are to be led by parti­cipants, speak­ers, and program lead­ers (work­shop goals and outcomes), the Crim­inal & Inform­a­tion Shar­ing Unit of the Sher­iff’s Office (qual­ity of data collec­ted from the online report­ing system), and unspe­cified entit­ies (effect­ive­ness of community outreach). Analysts in the Crim­inal Inform­a­tion Shar­ing & Analysis Unit of the Sher­iff’s Office will also docu­ment instances of cred­ible inform­a­tion referred to the Sher­iff’s Office and the FBI Joint Terror­ism Task Force via the online report­ing system.

Part­ners: Voices of East African Women, Ka-Joog Organ­iz­a­tion, Twin Cities Secur­ity Part­ner­ship (which includes Chief Secur­ity Officers from many of the Twin Cities largest compan­ies includ­ing Target, 3M, Cargill, General Mills, and St. Jude Medical), Metro Region Inform­a­tion Collab­or­a­tion, the Minnesota State Joint Analysis Center, other state-oper­ated fusion centers through­out the United States, DHS Customs & Border Protec­tion, Police Research Forum, DHS Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liber­ties, U.S. Attor­neys’ Office, FBI, Depart­ment of Justice Community Oriented Poli­cing Office, and the Depart­ment of State.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Unnamed community part­ners and organ­iz­a­tions ($100,000).

Consult­ant: Unnamed inde­pend­ent contractor or consult­ant ($60,000); CVE experts ($20,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Lincoln, NE (Nebraska Emer­gency Manage­ment Agency)

Name of Program: Address­ing barri­ers to report­ing signs of radic­al­iz­a­tion using a public health approach.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Public Safety.

Grant Amount: $300,000.

Targets: Rural and mid-sized communit­ies in Nebraska.

Key Facts: This program is premised on the notion that there are barri­ers to report­ing poten­tial signs of viol­ent extrem­ism in Nebraska, espe­cially among rural communit­ies exper­i­en­cing increases in diversity. To address this issue, the agency will dissem­in­ate exist­ing CVE train­ing mater­i­als from the National Consor­tium for the Study of Terror­ism and Responses to Terror­ism and the FBI, identi­fy­ing beha­vi­oral indic­at­ors of viol­ent extrem­ism, to local famil­ies, public health work­ers, and school teach­ers. It will also collect data on barri­ers to report­ing in these communit­ies.

Addi­tion­ally, Nebraska’s Depart­ments of Educa­tion and Health and Human Services and the Two Rivers Public Health Depart­ment, will help develop strategies that encour­age report­ing of beha­vi­ors asso­ci­ated with viol­ent extrem­ism to mental health experts and law enforce­ment. For example, the program will connect community lead­ers with Nebraska State Patrol’s Fusion Center, and other threat assess­ment profes­sion­als, to help them assess reports of poten­tial signs of viol­ent extrem­ism. The program envi­sions that indi­vidu­als iden­ti­fied as at-risk will be referred to public health depart­ments and uniden­ti­fied “trus­ted local organ­iz­a­tions.” It is unclear what will be done at that stage. The proposal only mentions one criteria for identi­fy­ing poten­tial terror­ists – paying off debts, which is some­thing that Muslims are meant to do before their deaths – suggest­ing that despite its neut­ral language it is in fact focus­ing on Muslims.

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Surveys conduc­ted in communit­ies will gauge “change in know­ledge about CVE warn­ing signs, report­ing processes, and levels of trust,” but there is no indic­a­tion that the success of such iden­ti­fic­a­tion or inter­ven­tions will be meas­ured.

Part­ners: Nebraska Fusion Center, Nebraska Emer­gency Manage­ment Agency, Nebraska’s Depart­ments of Educa­tion and Health and Human Services will work with the Univer­sity of Nebraska Public Policy Center.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Univer­sity of Nebraska Public Policy Center ($150,000); Two Rivers Public Health Depart­ment ($150,000).

Consult­ants: None iden­ti­fied.

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Las Vegas, NV (Las Vegas Metro­pol­itan Police Depart­ment)

Name of Program: South­ern Nevada Community Resi­li­ency and Inter­ven­tion Coali­tion.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Social Service.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.   

Grant Amount: $500,000.

Targets: 14–24-year-olds in South­ern Nevada, with a focus on Muslim and refugee youth.

Key Facts: Las Vegas police created the South­ern Nevada Community Resi­li­ency and Inter­ven­tion Coali­tion to address an increase in recruit­ment to viol­ent extrem­ism, espe­cially among youth and young adults. It is premised on the notion that community members are best placed to recog­nize and respond to warn­ing signs of viol­ent extrem­ist beha­vior and such iden­ti­fic­a­tion and report­ing should be suppor­ted. The program envi­sions that schools, law enforce­ment, and community part­ners will, based on unspe­cified criteria, refer indi­vidu­als iden­ti­fied as “at risk of recruit­ment to viol­ent extrem­ism” to the coali­tion, which includes social service providers, community mental health profes­sion­als, local non-profit organ­iz­a­tions, and cultural and reli­gious lead­ers. The coali­tion will eval­u­ate each case and determ­ine the appro­pri­ate response, which could include refer­rals to social services, uniden­ti­fied mental health providers, or law enforce­ment. The grant proposal indic­ates that search­ing for belong­ing, purpose, or iden­tity is linked to being at-risk for extrem­ist ideo­lo­gies.

The grant proposal recog­nizes that civil rights, civil liber­ties, and privacy of referred indi­vidu­als is “para­mount” to the program’s success and states that memor­anda of under­stand­ing and non-disclos­ure agree­ments are to be draf­ted for use by all members. It does not include specif­ics on what will be contained in these agree­ments.

The police and coali­tion will develop tools to assess indi­vidu­als as they progress through the inter­ven­tion process, but it is not clear what these tools will eval­u­ate. In addi­tion, tech­nical assist­ance providers will inde­pend­ently assess the program using an unspe­cified meth­od­o­logy. There is no indic­a­tion that the program will meas­ure whether repor­ted indi­vidu­als were found to pose a threat, or the impact of any inter­ven­tions.

Part­ners: Al-Maun Found­a­tion, ARMAN Found­a­tion, Clark County Depart­ment of Juven­ile Justice, Clark County School District, Police Exec­ut­ive Research Forum, South­ern Nevada Terror­ism Center, Safe Schools Program: Private/Charter/Reli­gious, and the Faith-Based Home­land Secur­ity Commit­tee.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed consult­ants/contracts for: estab­lish­ing, main­tain­ing, and eval­u­at­ing the coali­tion ($180,000), and creat­ing, devel­op­ing, and valid­at­ing refer­ral manage­ment resources ($110,000). Stipends for coali­tion board members ($180,000).

Support­ers: Al Maun Found­a­tion, ARMAN Refugee Migrant Assist­ant Network, Police Exec­ut­ive Research Forum.

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Jersey City, NJ (Global Peace Found­a­tion)

Name of Program: CVE Train-the-Trainer and Cross Community Engage­ment Program.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; CVE Online; Community Outreach.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $453,497.

Targets: Muslims; “immig­rants and other margin­al­ized popu­la­tions;” and at-risk young “Lati­nos, African-Amer­ican, Asian Indi­ans, Caucasian and Arabs” in Camden, Jersey City, and Peterson.

Key Facts: Accord­ing to the grant proposal, the program is needed to respond to an increase in young people join­ing viol­ent extrem­ist groups. Global Peace Found­a­tion will develop two train-the-trainer programs, both focused on identi­fy­ing unspe­cified beha­vi­ors and indic­at­ors asso­ci­ated with viol­ent extrem­ism for law enforce­ment person­nel and prosec­utors (in part­ner­ship with the New Jersey Attor­ney Gener­al’s office) and for “community lead­ers,” such as educat­ors, parents, pastors, and imams. The train­ing for community lead­ers will also deal with “when it is appro­pri­ate to notify law enforce­ment about indi­vidu­als at risk,” and include social media train­ing focused on how to recog­nize and report viol­ent extrem­ist messaging and counter-messaging strategies. Addi­tion­ally, police will parti­cip­ate in community engage­ment events, which aim to reach 1500 people, to facil­it­ate inform­a­tion shar­ing and increase police-community trust.

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

A semi­an­nual survey will be distrib­uted among law enforce­ment and community lead­ers to eval­u­ate program progress, although there is no inform­a­tion on what it will meas­ure. Addi­tion­ally, the program will use unspe­cified focus groups, data compil­a­tion, analysis, and report­ing to share best prac­tices and develop next steps.

Part­ners: Federal Admin­is­tra­tion on Chil­dren and Famil­ies, New Jersey State Asso­ci­ation of Chiefs of Police, New Jersey Divi­sion of Mental Health and Addic­tion Services, New Jersey Office of Faith-Based Initi­at­ives, New Jersey Insti­tute of Social Justice, New Jersey Board of Educa­tion, New Jersey Attor­ney Gener­al’s Office, New Jersey Depart­ment of Chil­dren and Famil­ies, Jersey City Police Depart­ment, Jersey City Public Schools.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed consult­ants/contracts to support monit­or­ing and eval­u­ation ($18,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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New York, NY (Tues­day’s Chil­dren)

Name of Program: Project COMMON BOND: Build­ing Resi­li­ence and Long-Term Heal­ing in Youth, Famil­ies & Communit­ies

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Social Service; CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $386,670.

Targets: Indi­vidu­als, espe­cially young people ages 15–20, famil­ies, and communit­ies, who have been impacted by terror­ism, viol­ent extrem­ism, or war.

Key Facts: Tues­day’s Chil­dren focuses on build­ing resi­li­ence in those impacted by terror­ism, viol­ent extrem­ism, or war. Accord­ing to the organ­iz­a­tion these indi­vidu­als are at higher risk of adopt­ing extrem­ist ideo­lo­gies due to past trauma. The organ­iz­a­tion will use the grant to expand two exist­ing programs: the Long-Term Heal­ing Model and Project COMMON BOND.

The Long-Term Heal­ing Model is designed to help service providers deliver programs to groups impacted by trau­matic events such as terror­ism. They will expand the initi­at­ive by train­ing service providers and “front­line work­ers in coun­ter­ing viol­ent extrem­ism and long-term disaster recov­ery” in an estim­ated six communit­ies per year and shar­ing the model in multiple formats (e.g. train-the-trainer curriculum, resource guide, online toolkit, etc.) with service providers, govern­ment agen­cies, and family support networks. Project COMMON BOND is an inter­na­tional peace-build­ing initi­at­ive that brings together teens and young adults from around the world who have been impacted by terror­ism, viol­ent extrem­ism, or war to engage in cross-cultural dialogue and learn to counter extrem­ist ideo­lo­gies and messaging.

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

Tues­day’s Chil­dren eval­u­ates the success of its programs through feed­back surveys, program eval­u­ations, and consulta­tion with experts, to assess parti­cipant skill attain­ment, motiv­a­tion, satis­fac­tion with the exper­i­ence. In addi­tion, Project COMMON BOND eval­u­ates changes in parti­cipants’ abil­ity “to respond thought­fully” rather than “react impuls­ively,” “to identify and response to preju­dices,” and “to main­tain a posit­ive outlook in the face of diffi­culty” (through eval­u­ations, feed­back sessions, and focus groups).

Part­ners: An appendix to the grant proposal lists 137 community, corpor­ate, inter­na­tional, and milit­ary part­ners, but the docu­ment does not expli­citly link any of them to the programs to be funded by this grant.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Sallie Lynch, Candida Cucharo, and Monica Meehan McNamara ($134,580 to be split among the three consult­ants).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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New York, NY (Counter Extrem­ism Project)

Name of Program: Muslim World Today Support Program.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/Research.

Grant Amount: $298,760.

Targets: Muslim teens and young adults, espe­cially recent immig­rants from South and Cent­ral Asia.

Key Facts: This program is premised on the view that “the anti-West­ern propa­ganda of extrem­ist recruit­ers” can be countered by foster­ing “a greater sense toler­ance and plur­al­ism” within Muslim Amer­ican communit­ies, espe­cially recent immig­rants from South and Cent­ral Asia. The grant will fund Muslim­WorldToday.org, a website that promotes “ideas of toler­ance found natur­ally within Islam” as well as related digital outreach. Over one-third of the funds will be funneled to the Coun­cil for Demo­cracy and Toler­ance which is headed by an indi­vidual with links to anti-Muslim elements, such as the Middle East Forum’s “project to resist the Islam­ist agenda to spread Shar­i’a through lawful means.” 

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

The Counter Extrem­ism Project and the Coun­cil for Demo­cracy and Toler­ance will conduct joint monit­or­ing and eval­u­ation of key program­matic outputs/outcomes, digital outputs (assessed by Brick Factor and Mercury Digital Media Strategies), and public outreach (via digital surveys completed by parti­cipants in the plat­form’s online outreach programs).

Part­ners: Coun­cil for Demo­cracy and Toler­ance, Mercury Digital Outreach Campaign, Brick Fact­ory LLC.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Coun­cil for Demo­cracy and Toler­ance ($120,000), Brick Fact­ory, Inc. ($11,840); and Mercury Digital Media Strategies LLC ($26,000).

Consult­ants: Unnamed contract­ors for initial website build ($2,240) and tech­nical support ($9,600).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Rochester, NY (Rochester Insti­tute of Tech­no­logy)

Name of Program: It’s Time: #ExOut Extrem­ism

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Academic/ Research.

Grant Amount: $149,955.

Targets: Youth between the ages of 16 to 24.

Key Facts: ExOut was created to respond to the grow­ing threat of online recruit­ment to ISIS through social media campaigns promot­ing toler­ance and inclu­sion. Accord­ing to the proposal, young people who use social media for 3.5 hours per week on aver­age are “uniquely vulner­able” to terror­ist recruit­ment. This grant will enhance current initi­at­ives, partic­u­larly the “ExOut through Educa­tion” campaign. Through work­shops and seminars, the Rochester Insti­tute will educate teach­ers and students in New York about “the differ­ences between Islam and ISIL,” and how they can combat viol­ent extrem­ism online and offline. The grant will fund a new inter­act­ive mobile app to serve as the main teach­ing and learn­ing plat­form.

The grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.  

ExOut will eval­u­ate online engage­ment using social media and digital analyt­ics (comments, clicks, shares). Addi­tion­ally, it will eval­u­ate the impact of its educa­tion campaign by using the new mobile app to collect meas­ure­ment data using pre- and post-program surveys, which include “demo­graph­ical and atti­tu­dinal vari­ables of interest.” 

Part­ners: Islamic Center of Rochester, Muslim Student Asso­ci­ation of Rochester Insti­tute of Tech­no­logy.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed team of developers ($37,700).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Nashville, TN (Nashville Inter­na­tional Center for Empower­ment)

Name of Program: Proact­ive Engage­ment to Achieve Community Empower­ment (PEACE).

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Social Service.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $445,110.

Targets: 500+ “New Amer­ic­ans” (i.e., refugees, immig­rants, and chil­dren of immig­rants) in the middle Tennessee area.

Key facts: The program intends to address disen­fran­chise­ment and the threat of terror­ist recruit­ment among middle Tenness­ee’s large refugee popu­la­tion, espe­cially Somali youth. In collab­or­a­tion with Peace Ambas­sad­ors USA, the Center will recruit 500+ “New Amer­ic­ans” who “may be considered at risk for viol­ent extrem­ism” through outreach, includ­ing present­a­tions in schools and churches. The program will facil­it­ate community parti­cip­a­tion in annual forums (inter­faith organ­iz­a­tion-led dialogues on inclu­sion and peace­build­ing), outreach activ­it­ies (e.g., educator and prin­cipal-led “cultural train­ing”), and youth engage­ment, lead­er­ship, and ment­or­ship activ­it­ies (led by reli­gious and community lead­ers). In conjunc­tion with the Metro-Nashville Police, the program will facil­it­ate parent­ing work­shops focused on train­ing to “teach disen­gage­ment from viol­ent extrem­ist beha­vi­ors,” which suggests that police will provide inform­a­tion on signs of such beha­vi­ors. The program also includes refer­rals to uniden­ti­fied mental health providers and community services (e.g. employ­ment train­ing), which seem to oper­ate in conjunc­tion with the latter. Although the proposal does not identify the beha­vi­ors that specific­ally warrant refer­ral, it states that social exclu­sion, discrim­in­a­tion, and frus­tra­tions with govern­ment were linked to possible “collect­ive viol­ence.”

Despite the obvi­ous risks, the grant proposal does not mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy.

The program will be eval­u­ated using a frame­work for assess­ing devel­op­ment assist­ance that, accord­ing to the grant proposal, has been sugges­ted by DHS for CVE. They will also use a frame­work that meas­ures the qual­ity of programs for youth, such as inter­ac­tion, engage­ment, access, youth and staff expect­a­tions, youth-centered­ness of prac­tices, and safety and support of the envir­on­ment.

Part­ners: Peace Ambas­sad­ors USA (PA-USA), Metro­pol­itan Police Depart­ment of Nashville and David­son County, and unnamed prin­cipals and educat­ors in Metro-Nashville David­son County Public Schools.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed speak­ers ($20,000); “creat­ive services” ($10,000).

Support­ers: Metro­pol­itan Govern­ment of Nashville and David­son County, Metro­pol­itan Police Depart­ment of Nashville and David­son County, Islamic Center of Tennessee, Family Engage­ment Univer­sity (affil­i­ated with Metro-Nashville Public Schools), Sala­hadeen Center of Nashville, and the Belcourt.

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Arling­ton, TX (Arling­ton Police Depart­ment)

Name of Program: Project Connect.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Community Outreach; poten­tially Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.  

Grant Amount: $47,497.

Targets: Estim­ated 2,000 Arling­ton resid­ents, with a focus on Muslims.

Key Facts: In response to the city’s grow­ing Muslim popu­la­tion, Arling­ton police estab­lished Project Connect, which provides crime preven­tion train­ing in mosques, Muslim community groups, and several uniden­ti­fied schools and aims to build rela­tions through tradi­tional community outreach activ­it­ies such as “meet and greets.” A former FBI agent, Gamal Abdel Hafiz, has been hired to liaise with Muslim communit­ies and assist in devel­op­ing CVE train­ing curricula. The grant proposal does not specify whether crime preven­tion train­ing and the CVE mater­i­als to be developed by Hafiz will aim to encour­age the report­ing of indi­vidu­als as poten­tial viol­ent extrem­ists. The proposal notes, however, that the program’s “activ­it­ies may not be accep­ted in all Muslim community groups” and could encounter “some push­back from indi­vidu­als and groups in the community.” This may be a refer­ence to community oppos­i­tion to CVE programs and could suggest that crime preven­tion train­ing will be focused on identi­fy­ing indi­vidu­als as poten­tial viol­ent extrem­ists.

The grant proposal states that Project Connect activ­it­ies “are not inten­ded for the purpose of restrict­ing a resid­ent’s civil rights, civil liber­ties, or privacy,” but does not eval­u­ate whether they have the poten­tial to do so.

People attend­ing programs will receive an eval­u­ation form which will meas­ure the util­ity of the format and the topics covered. Six-monthly program “progress reports” will meas­ure mark­ers such as over­all program attend­ance at events and “the number of Muslim enrollees in [Arling­ton Police Depart­ment] citizens’ programs.”

Part­ners: Arling­ton Clergy & Police Part­ner­ship.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tion: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Gamal Abdel Hafiz ($13,125).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Hous­ton, TX (Hous­ton Mayor’s Office)

Name of Program: Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism Train­ing and Engage­ment Initi­at­ive.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Inter­ven­tion; Social Service.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Public Safety.

Grant Amount: $500,000.

Targets: 810,000 youth of the Greater Hous­ton region and nearly 1.5 million family house­holds, with a focus on Muslim communit­ies.

Key Facts: The grant proposal stresses the need to reduce the risk of terror­ism in the city as Hous­ton rises to prom­in­ence as a nation­wide leader in refugee reset­tle­ment and cultural and reli­gious diversity. To do so, the office will estab­lish and coordin­ate a multi-discip­lin­ary CVE “steer­ing commit­tee,” made up of govern­mental, inter-faith, non-profit, law enforce­ment, and academic part­ners. In conjunc­tion with the FBI and Hous­ton’s fusion center, this commit­tee will develop work­shops for Muslim parents and youth that aim to explain “terror­ism ideo­lo­gies” and the “root causes of extrem­ism,” as well as risk factors and avail­able social and community resources. An addendum to the applic­a­tion describes a number of activ­it­ies supposedly linked to people at-risk for extrem­ist ideo­logy. Uniden­ti­fied consult­ants with “CVE expert­ise” will conduct initial train­ings, while community lead­ers will be iden­ti­fied and trained to serve as future facil­it­at­ors (“train-the-trainer” program).

Part­ners from the Anti-Defam­a­tion League will assist the CVE steer­ing commit­tee with “ensur­ing civil rights and civil liber­ties are protec­ted,” but the proposal provides no specif­ics.

The success of the initi­at­ive will be eval­u­ated based on activ­it­ies conduc­ted (e.g., number of youth and parent work­shops held, the number of train­ers vetted, trained, and certi­fied). There will also be work­shop eval­u­ation responses and follow-up surveys, but it is not known what they will meas­ure.

Part­ners: Rice Univer­sity, Univer­sity of Hous­ton, Islamic Soci­ety of Greater Hous­ton, United Way, Federal Bureau of Invest­ig­a­tions, Hous­ton Regional Intel­li­gence Service Center (Fusion Center), Anti-Defam­a­tion League, Hous­ton Regional CVE Steer­ing Commit­tee.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: None iden­ti­fied.

Consult­ants: Unnamed consult­ants for curriculum devel­op­ment ($152,000), the train-the trainer initi­at­ive ($50,000), project manage­ment support ($160,750), commu­nic­a­tions and media ($50,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Hous­ton, TX (Crisis Inter­ven­tion of Hous­ton)

Name of Program: Community Collab­or­at­ive to Counter Viol­ent Extrem­ism in Hous­ton, TX.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: CVE Online; Inter­ven­tion.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Non-Profit.

Grant Amount: $500,000.

Targets: Primar­ily young Muslims in the city of Hous­ton, as well as Lati­nos and South Asians.

Key Facts:  Two groups, Crisis Inter­ven­tion and Alli­ance for Compas­sion and Toler­ance, have created a CVE program to address the risk of viol­ent extrem­ist recruit­ment in Hous­ton. The groups emphas­ize that the city’s diversity (e.g. “most diverse in the nation,” “largest number of refugees,” “over 100 mosques and a dozen Islamic schools”) makes it a model for pion­eer­ing inter­ven­tion activ­it­ies across the coun­try. The program will oper­ate an anonym­ous crisis hotline for “indi­vidu­als strug­gling with thoughts of viol­ent extrem­ism” and run anti-bully­ing work­shops for “Arab, Latino, and South Asian chil­dren” who are “called ‘ter­ror­ist’ by class­mates because of their faith or skin color.” Addi­tion­ally, it will train parents and community lead­ers from over 100 mosques and a dozen Islamic schools on unspe­cified “warn­ing signs to watch for with their chil­dren for online extrem­ism,” and train community/youth lead­ers to facil­it­ate discus­sions address­ing youth concerns, such as “ques­tions on reli­gious texts, soci­opol­it­ical issues, and terror­ism.” It is not clear what will happen to inform­a­tion gleaned from the hotline, but the proposal does mention provid­ing callers who exhibit “warn­ing signs” with inform­a­tion about unspe­cified community resources. An addendum to the applic­a­tion describes a number of activ­it­ies supposedly linked to people at-risk of extrem­ist ideo­logy.

The proposal states that “protect­ing privacy, civil rights, and civil liber­ties is of utmost import­ance” to the program but does not include specific inform­a­tion on how this will be accom­plished. 

Crisis Inter­ven­tion has the most extens­ive metrics among all CVE grantees. It plans to conduct eval­u­ations for the anti-bully­ing work­shop (parti­cipant surveys and bian­nual assess­ments), the hotline (changes to call data), the online safety work­shop for parents (parti­cipant surveys), and discus­sions address­ing youth concerns (parti­cipant surveys). For the hotline, the group plans to assess, using crisis manage­ment metrics, whether the coun­sel­ing provided preven­ted terror­ist attacks as well as.

Part­ners: Alli­ance for Compas­sion and Toler­ance, Shifa Clinic, Organ­iz­a­tion of Pakistani Entre­pren­eurs, River Oaks Islamic Center, EMERGE USA Hous­ton, Salaam Reentry Program, WISE, Muslim Profes­sional Asso­ci­ation, Amaa­nah Refugee Services, Univer­sity of Hous­ton, Center for Borders, Trade and Immig­ra­tion Research, Rice Univer­sity, United Way, Anti-Defam­a­tion League, World Affairs Coun­cil of Hous­ton, Hous­ton Police Depart­ment, Harris County Sher­iff’s Office, Federal Bureau of Invest­ig­a­tion, A.T. Still Univer­sity, Indus Arts Coun­cil, Islamic Arts Soci­ety & Muslim Artists of Hous­ton, Inter­sec­tions Inter­na­tional, Islamic Soci­ety of Greater Hous­ton.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Alli­ance for Compas­sion and Toler­ance ($100,000).

Consult­ants: Unnamed consult­ant for market­ing/outreach and train­ing ($156,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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Seattle, WA (Seattle Police Depart­ment)

Name of Program: Coun­ter­ing Viol­ent Extrem­ism Program.

Detailed Program Inform­a­tion: Avail­able here [PDF].

Type of Program: Community Outreach; Social Service.

Type of Organ­iz­a­tion: Police Depart­ment.

Grant Amount: $409,390.

Targets: Immig­rants and refugees, “disen­gaged youth” aged 5–18, and “disen­fran­chised Seattleites” (such as African Amer­ican, Native Amer­ican, Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and home­less popu­la­tions).

Key Facts: The program targets groups it considers to be “at risk” for viol­ent extrem­ism and aims to address the threat by improv­ing community cohe­sion and trust in law enforce­ment. The Seattle police have an exist­ing program focused on combin­ing community engage­ment, crime data, and police services in “micro” communit­ies, which they are expand­ing. Police will parti­cip­ate in work­shops with refugees and immig­rants to improve officers’ under­stand­ing of minor­ity cultures and community members’ under­stand­ing of police proced­ures and laws. Officers will coach and mentor youth from communit­ies of color. They will also help conduct youth work­shops in schools, which may result in refer­ring students to mental health services. Finally, officers will facil­it­ate integ­ra­tion sessions to address issues raised by “disen­fran­chised Seattleites.”

The grant proposal does mention poten­tial impacts to civil rights, but only in refer­ence to a 2014 Depart­ment of Justice funded CVE guide.

Seattle Univer­sity research­ers will eval­u­ate the program through community surveys that meas­ure “percep­tions of police, neigh­bor­hood features, and crime as related to public safety,” and the “demand and success of addi­tional community activ­it­ies and services” result­ing from this grant.

Part­ners: Seattle Univer­sity, Seattle Police Depart­ment Demo­graphic Advis­ory Coun­cils, Seattle Office of Immig­rant and Refugee Affairs, King County Rehab­il­it­a­tion Center, Seattle Public Inter­agency Schools, and unnamed city, faith, and community-based organ­iz­a­tions.

Pass-through Organ­iz­a­tions: Seattle Univer­sity ($60,000), Inter­pret­a­tion Insti­tute ($12,400).

Consult­ants: Unnamed Public Outreach and Engage­ment Liais­ons ($18,000), facil­it­ator for the Immig­rant Family Insti­tute ($10,000), and instructor to train Immig­rant Family Insti­tute and Seattle Police Depart­ment about trauma care ($3,000).

Support­ers: None iden­ti­fied.

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