Buying Time 2016 - Kentucky

This page features Kentucky Supreme Court television advertisements from the 2016 election cycle.

May 30, 2017

On November 8th, one seat was up for election on Kentucky's Supreme Court. In Kentucky, justices are chosen in nonpartisan elections and serve for eight year terms. Court of Appeals Judge Laurance VanMeter defeated Court of Appeals Judge Gelnn Acree for an open seat. The seat was previously held by Deputy Chief Justice Mary Noble, who did not seek reelection. 

The Brennan Center used multiple sources for spending information, which showed the following: 

Kantar Media/CMAG: Estimated Total Spending: $129,680*

  • Estimated Spending by Laurance VanMeter: $129,680

*Spending estimates last updated on May 30, 2017.

FCC Contracts: Recorded TV Contracts: $129,650*

  • Television ad buys recorded for Laurance VanMeter: $129,650

*Recorded ad buys last updated on October 18, 2016

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Advertisements


October 18 -  Experience

Stream Video (QT) | Download Storyboard

Sponsor: Laurance VanMeter

Estimated Spending (Kantar Media/CMAG): $45,530


October 17 -  Isabel Yates

Stream Video (QT) | Download Storyboard

In this ad, Yates says VanMeter "understands our community and [she] trusts him to make the right decision."

Sponsor: Laurance VanMeter

Estimated Spending (Kantar Media/CMAG): $43,840


October 17 -  Judicial Excellence

Stream Video (QT) | Download Storyboard

This ad highlight's VanMeter's experience in the lower courts. 

Sponsor: Laurance VanMeter

Estimated Spending (Kantar Media/CMAG): $40,310


Methodology


Data on ad airings and spending on ads are calculated and prepared by Kantar Media/CMAG, which captures satellite data in the nation’s largest media markets. CMAG’s estimates do not reflect ad agency commissions or the costs of producing advertisements, nor do they reflect the cost of ad buys on local cable channels. Cost estimates are revised by Kantar Media/CMAG when it receives updated data, resulting in some fluctuations in the reported ad spending.

Data on spending on ads was also compiled from ad purchase contracts posted by the FCC and from state disclosure databases when available.