Mover's Guide: Maryland

August 10, 2010

Board of Elections:  800-222-8683

I moved from the address at which I am registered.  What should I do?

I moved from another state.

If you moved to Maryland from another state, you must register in Maryland to be able to vote.[1]  The last day to register in time to vote in the next election is by 9 p.m. 21 days before the election.[2]

If you moved from out of state, you may register to vote the same day you become a resident of the State of Maryland.  Under federal law, if you move within thirty days of a presidential election, you are allowed to vote for President and Vice President in your former state of residence, either in person or by absentee ballot.[3]

I moved within Maryland.

If you moved to a new address within the state, you should notify your election official of the address change in order to update your registration records.  This can be done in many ways, including: sending a signed written notice to your local board of elections, appearing in person, or completing a voter registration form.[4]  The voter registration form is available here: http://www.elections.state.md.us/voter_registration/documents/2011_English_Internet_VRA.pdf.

The election is right around the corner and I never updated my registration from my previous address.  What should I do?

If you moved to a new address in the state since you last voted, you should contact your local election office to determine whether your registration is current and to find out the location of your current polling place. Election officials may have changed your registration record to reflect your new address even if you did not notify the election official about the move. If your registration information has been changed to your current address, you should go to the polling place associated with that address to vote.

Many registered Maryland voters who move are still entitled to cast a ballot that will be counted — even if they did not notify the appropriate election official about their move before Election Day and the election official has not changed their registration.

Scenario One: New Address, but Same Polling Place

If you moved to a new address that is covered by the same polling place as your old address, you remain registered and can vote a provisional ballot at your polling place.[5]

Scenario Two: New Address in Same County and Congressional District but New Polling Place

If you moved to a new address within the same county and congressional district but in a different polling place, you remain registered and can vote a provisional ballot at your new polling place.[6]

Scenario Three: New Address in New County or New Congressional District

If you moved to a new address that is in a different county or a different congressional district, you remain registered and can vote a provisional ballot at your new polling place.[7]


[1] Md. Code Ann., Elec. Law § 3-102(a)(1) (West 2010).

[2] Md. Code Ann., Elec. Law § 3-302(a).

[3] 42 U.S.C. § 1973aa-1(e) (2010).

[4] Md. Code Ann., Elec. Law § 3-304(a)(1)(i)-(v) (emphasis added).

[5] See email from state election official to Brennan Center (Oct. 15, 2010) (on file with Brennan Center).

[6] Md. Code Ann., Elec. Law § 3-101(e) (West 2010); see also http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/index.html (last visited Aug. 17, 2010).

[7] Md. Code Ann., Elec. Law § 3-101(e); see also http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/index.html (last visited Aug. 17, 2010).