Mover's Guide: Florida

August 10, 2010

Division of Elections:  850-245-6200

I moved from the address at which I am registered.  What should I do?

I moved from another state.

If you moved to Florida from another state, you must register to vote in Florida to be able to vote.[1]  The last day to register in time to vote in the next election is twenty-nine days before the next election.[2]

If you moved from out of state, you may register to vote the same day you become a resident of the State of Florida.  And, under federal law, if you move within 30 days of a presidential election, you are allowed to vote for President and Vice President in your former state of residence, either in person or by absentee ballot.[3]

I moved within Florida.

If you move within the same county, you should notify the county supervisor of elections of your address change.[4]  If you move to a different county within Florida, you should complete a new registration form to update your registration records.[5]  That form is available here:  http://election.dos.state.fl.us/voter-registration/voter-reg.shtml

The election is right around the corner and I never updated my registration from my previous address.  What should I do?

Many registered Florida voters who move are still entitled to cast a ballot that will be counted — even if they did not notify the appropriate election official about the move before Election Day.

Scenario One: New Address, but Same Polling Place

If you moved to a new address that is covered by the same polling place as your old address, you can vote a regular ballot at that polling place after confirming your change of address at the polling place. This is true regardless of how close to the election you moved.[6]

Scenario Two: New Address in Same County but New Polling Place

If you moved to a new address within the same county but with a different polling place, you are entitled to vote a regular ballot at your new polling place after affirming your new address in writing or filling out a voter registration application for the new address, and after your existing registration is verified.[7]

If your registration cannot be confirmed you can cast a provisional ballot.[8]  Your provisional ballot will be counted if you were registered and entitled to vote at the polling place, you have not already voted elsewhere, and your signature on the provisional ballot matches the signature on your registration.[9]

Scenario Three: New Address in New County

If you moved to a new address in a different county, you are entitled to vote a regular ballot at your new polling place after affirming the new address or completing a new voter registration application and after your existing registration is verified.[10]  You can vote a provisional ballot if your eligibility cannot be confirmed.[11]

Your provisional ballot will be counted if you were registered and entitled to vote at the polling place, you have not already voted elsewhere, and your signature on the provisional ballot matches the signature on your registration.[12]


[1] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 101.045(1) (West 2010).

[2] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 97.055(1)(a).

[3] 42 U.S.C. § 1973aa-1(e) (2010).

[4] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 97.1031(1) (West 2010).

[5] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 97.1031(2).

[6]  42 U.S.C. § 1973gg-6(e)(1) (2010).

[7] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 101.045(2)(a), (c), (d) (West 2010).

[8] Fla. Stat. Ann. §§ 101.045(2)(c), 101.048(1).

[9] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 101.048(2)(a)–(b).

[10] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 101.045(2)(a), (c), (d).

[11] Fla. Stat. Ann. §§ 101.045(2)(c), 101.048(1).

[12] Fla. Stat. Ann. § 101.048(2)(a)–(b).