Research

  • Photo ID

    Much of the hue and cry about voter fraud is accompanied by calls for restrictive ID requirements, like laws requiring voters to show particular photo ID documents at the polls. Some of this may be a sincere, if mistaken, belief in the need for restrictive ID measures. But this clip from a May 17, 2007, Houston Chronicle article suggests another rationale:

    November 10, 2007
  • There are almost no known cases in which individuals have filled out registration forms in someone else’s name in order to impersonate them at the polls. And most reports of registration fraud do not actually claim that the fraud happens so that ineligible people can vote at the polls.

    Instead, when registration fraud is alleged, the allegations generally fall into one of four categories:

    November 10, 2007
  • There are a handful of known cases in which votes have been cast in the names of individuals who have died before the vote was submitted.

    It is far more common, however, to see allegations of epidemic voting from beyond the grave, with a chuckle and a reference to Gov. Huey Long’s quip ("When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics.") or Rep. Charlie Rangel’s update (same idea, but takes place in Chicago).

    November 10, 2007
  • There are a handful of known cases in which votes have been cast from improper addresses.

    November 10, 2007
  • We are not aware of any documented cases in which individual noncitizens have either intentionally registered to vote or voted while knowing that they were ineligible. Given that the penalty (criminal prosecution and deportation) is so severe, and the payoff (one incremental vote) is so minimal for any individual voter, it makes sense that extremely few noncitizens would attempt to vote, knowing that doing so is illegal.

    November 10, 2007

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