Aziz Huq on Boumediene v. Bush and Guantanamo's Future

Brennan Center's Aziz Huq appeared on Lawyer 2 Lawyer to discuss the recent SCOTUS decision in Boumediene v. Bush. Radio show posted to the Legal Talk Network on June 19.

June 19, 2008

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Brennan Center's Aziz Huq appeared on Lawyer 2 Lawyer to discuss the recent SCOTUS decision in Boumediene v. Bush. Radio show posted to the Legal Talk Network on June 19.

 


Description:
In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled in Boumediene v. Bush, that suspected terrorists and foreign fighters held by the U.S. military at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have the right to challenge their detention in federal court. Law.com blogger and co-host, J. Craig Williams, welcomes experts, Aziz Huq, Deputy Director from The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law and Attorney Edward Lazarus, partner at the firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP and author of Closed Chambers: The Rise, Fall, and Future of the Modern Supreme Court to explore this significant ruling. They will discuss habeas corpus rights of Guantanamo detainees and others, the effect on the war on terrorism and what this means for detainees.


Listen here:
 

 

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Aziz Huq is counsel in several cases concerning detention and
national security policy, including Omar v. Geren and Munaf v.
Geren
, challenges to US citizen's detention in Iraq. He has advised and spoken
before legislators on issues related to the Separation of Powers, excessive
secrecy, and illegal detention. His book with Fritz Schwarz, Unchecked
and Unbalanced: Presidential Power In A Time of Terror
(New Press),
was published in 2007, and will be reissued in paperback in spring 2008. He is
a frequent contributor to The Nation, the American Prospect,
the New York Law Journal and Huffington Post. His articles
have also appeared in the Washington Post, the New Republic,
Democracy Journal, TomPaine, and Colorlines. In 2006
he was selected to be a Carnegie Fellows Scholar. He also teaches a seminar in
Just War Theory and Terrorism at NYU School of Law.